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            Websites and Blogs

            There are a lot of websites out there that present data on Windows Device Drivers. The websites I most recommend are:

            This is the Microsoft site for Windows Driver related material.
            This is Open System Resources site for articles, tools and samples for Windows Device Drivers. This is the biggest site for Windows Device Driver data outside of Microsoft.
            A collection of utilities, information and source code for Windows. Note: the source is available for reference purposes use in your projects requires a license.

            There a number of active blogs in the Windows Device Driver space:

            This is a blog by the folks that maintain the USB driver stack.
            – This is the place to go for information about the Windows Network Device Platform.
            Get the news and information on certifying your drivers.
            This is a set of highly useful tips and techniques from the developers at OSR.
            A blog by Pete Scott of Kernel Drivers, with good technical discussions.
            This blog is dedicated to the advanced debugging and troubleshooting of scenarios on Microsoft Windows platforms. It is written by seasoned escalation engineers that spend their days debugging and digging deep into Windows code and related issues and the internals of the Windows operating system

            Microsoft has a number of not directly related to drivers, but important since they let you know what is going on in the Windows ecosystem.

            Also, there are several good blogs that are no longer active, but which contain a lot of useful data:

            Doron Holan’s musings on kernel mode drivers and other nibbles and bits.
            Peter Wieland’s thoughts on Windows driver development, and occasional rants about computing in general.
            Discussions of issues of security that every kernel developer needs to know. Michael is co-author of Writing Secure Code.